Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer | Breast Cancer Treatment (2022)

Some types of breast cancer are affected by hormones, like estrogen and progesterone. The breast cancer cells have receptors (proteins) that attach to estrogen and progesterone, which helps them grow. Treatments that stop these hormones from attaching to these receptors are called hormone or endocrine therapy.

Hormone therapy can reach cancer cells almost anywhere in the body and not just in the breast. It's recommended for women with tumors that are hormone receptor-positive. It does not help women whose tumors don't have hormone receptors (these tumors are called hormone receptor-negative).

When is hormone therapy used for breast cancer?

Hormone therapy is often used after surgery (as adjuvant therapy) to help reduce the risk of the cancer coming back. Sometimes it is started before surgery (as neoadjuvant therapy).

It is usually taken for at least 5 years. Treatment longer than 5 years might be offered to women whose cancers have a higher chance of coming back. A test called the Breast Cancer Index might be used to help decide if a woman will benefit from more than 5 years of hormone therapy.

Hormone therapy can also be used to treat cancer that has come back after treatment or that has spread to other parts of the body.

How does hormone therapy work?

About 2 out of 3 breast cancers are hormone receptor-positive. Their cells have receptors (proteins) for estrogen (ER-positive cancers) and/or progesterone (PR-positive cancers) which help the cancer cells grow and spread.

There are several types of hormone therapy for breast cancer. Most types of hormone therapy either lower estrogen levels in the body or stop estrogen from helping breast cancer cells grow.

(Video) Endocrine Treatment in Breast Cancer

Drugs that block estrogen receptors

These drugs work by stopping estrogen from fueling breast cancer cells to grow.

Tamoxifen

Tamoxifen blocks estrogen from connecting to the cancer cells and telling them to grow and divide. While tamoxifen acts like an anti-estrogen in breast cells, it acts like an estrogen in other tissues, like the uterus and the bones. Because of this, it is called a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). It can be used to treat women with breast cancer who have or have not gone through menopause.

Tamoxifen can be used in several ways:

  • In women at high risk of breast cancer, tamoxifen can be used to help lower the risk of developing breast cancer.
  • For women who have been treated with breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that is hormone receptor-positive, taking tamoxifen for 5 years lowers the chance of the DCIS coming back in the same breast. It also lowers the chance of getting an invasive breast cancer or another DCIS in both breasts.
  • For women with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer treated with surgery, tamoxifen can help lower the chances of the cancer coming back and improve the chances of living longer. It can also lower the risk of a new cancer developing in the other breast. Tamoxifen can be started either after surgery (adjuvant therapy) or before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy). When given after surgery, it is usually taken for 5 to 10 years. This drug is used mainly for women with early-stage breast cancer who have not yet gone through menopause. If you have gone through menopause, aromatase inhibitors (see below) are often used instead.
  • For women with hormone-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, tamoxifen can often help slow or stop the growth of the cancer, and might even shrink some tumors.

Toremifene (Fareston)

This is another SERM that works in a similar way, but it is used less often and is only approved to treat post-menopausal women with metastatic breast cancer. It is not likely to work if tamoxifen has already been used and has stopped working. These drugs are pills, taken by mouth.

Side effects of tamoxifen and toremifene

The most common side effects of tamoxifen and toremifene are:

  • Hot flashes
  • Vaginal dryness or discharge
  • Changes in the menstrual cycle

When tamoxifen treatment starts, a small number of women with cancer that has spread to the bones might have a tumor flare (the tumor gets biggerfor a short time) which can cause bone pain. This usually decreases quickly, but in some rare cases a woman may also develop a high calcium level in the blood that is hard to control. If this happens, the treatment may need to be stopped for a time.

Rare, but more serious side effects are also possible:

(Video) Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer: We Teach You

  • If a woman has gone through menopause, SERMs can increase her risk of developing endometrial cancer and uterine sarcoma. Tell your doctor right away about any unusual vaginal bleeding (a common symptom of this cancer). Most uterine bleeding is not from cancer, but this symptom always needs quick attention.
  • Blood clots are another uncommon, but serious side effect. They usually form in the legs (called deep vein thrombosis or DVT), but sometimes a piece of clot in the leg may break off and end up blocking an artery in the lungs (pulmonary embolism or PE). Call your doctor or nurse right away if you develop pain, redness, or swelling in your lower leg (calf), shortness of breath, or chest pain, because these can be symptoms of a DVT or PE. Rarely, tamoxifen has been associated with strokes in postmenopausal women, so tell your doctor if you have severe headaches, confusion, or trouble speaking or moving.
  • Eye problems, such as cataracts, are sometimes seen when taking tamoxifen. It is important to tell your doctor right away if you are having any new trouble with your eyesight.
  • Bones can be affected. Depending on a woman's menopausal status, tamoxifen can have different effects on the bones. In pre-menopausal women, tamoxifen can cause some bone thinning, but in post-menopausal women it often strengthens bones to some degree. The benefits of taking these drugs outweigh the risks for almost all women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

Fulvestrant (Faslodex)

Fulvestrant is a drug that attaches to and breaks down estrogen receptors. It is not a SERM. It is known asa selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD). It acts like an anti-estrogen throughout the body.When given to pre-menopausal women it must be combined with a luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist to turn off the ovaries (see Ovarian suppression below).

Fulvestrant can be given:

  • Alone to treat advanced breast cancer that has not been treated with other hormone therapy.
  • Aloneto treat advanced breast cancer after other hormone drugs (like tamoxifen and often an aromatase inhibitor) have stopped working.
  • In combination with a CDK 4/6 inhibitor or PI3K inhibitor to treat metastatic breast cancer as initial hormone therapy or after other hormone treatments have been tried.

It is given by 2 injections into the buttocks (bottom). For the first month, the 2 shots are given 2 weeks apart. After that, they are given once a month.

Side effects of fulvestrant

Common short-term side effects can include:

  • Hot flashes and/or night sweats
  • Headache
  • Mild nausea
  • Bone pain
  • Injection site pain

Drugs that lower estrogen levels

Because estrogen stimulates hormone receptor-positive breast cancers to grow, lowering the estrogen level can help slow the cancer’s growth or help prevent it from coming back.

Aromatase inhibitors (AIs)

Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are drugs that stop most estrogen production in the body. Before menopause, most estrogen is made by the ovaries. But in women whose ovaries aren’t working, either because they have gone through menopause or because of certain treatments, estrogen is still made in body fat by an enzyme called aromatase. AIs work by preventing aromatase from making estrogen.

These drugs are useful for women who have gone through menopause, although they can also be used in pre-menopausal women when they are combined with ovarian suppression (see below).

(Video) Do I Need Hormonal Therapy to Treat Breast Cancer?

These AIs are pills taken every day totreat breast cancer:

  • Letrozole (Femara)
  • Anastrozole (Arimidex)
  • Exemestane (Aromasin)

Possible side effects of AIs

The most common side effects of AIs are:

  • Hot flashes
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Bone and joint pain
  • Muscle pain

AIs tend to have side effects different from tamoxifen. They don't cause uterine cancers and very rarely cause blood clots. They can, however, cause muscle pain and joint stiffness and/or pain. The joint pain may be similar to a feeling of having arthritis in many different joints at one time. Options for treating this side effect include, stopping the AI and thenswitching to a different AI, taking a medicine called duloxetine (Cymbalta), or routine exercise with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). But the muscle and joint painhas led some women to stop treatment. If this happens, most doctors recommend using tamoxifen to complete 5 to 10 years of hormone treatment.

Because AIs drastically lower the estrogen level in women after menopause, they can also cause bone thinning, sometimes leading to osteoporosis and even fractures. If you are taking an AI, your bone density may be tested regularly and you may also be given bisphosphonates (zoledronic acid [Zometa] for example) or denosumab (Xgeva, Prolia), to strengthen your bones.

Ovarian suppression

For pre-menopausal women, removing or shutting down the ovaries (ovarian suppression), which are the main source of estrogen, is effectively making them post-menopausal. This may allow some other hormone therapies, such as AIs, to be used. Ovarian suppression along with tamoxifen or an AI might be recommended for women whose breast cancer is at high risk of coming back.

There are several ways to remove or shut down the ovaries to treat breast cancer:

  • Oophorectomy: Surgery to remove the ovaries. This is permanent and is also called ovarian ablation.
  • Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists: These drugs are used more often than oophorectomy. They stop the signal that the body sends to the ovaries to make estrogen, which causes temporary menopause. Common LHRH drugs include goserelin (Zoladex) and leuprolide (Lupron). They can be used alone or with other hormone drugs (tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, fulvestrant) as hormone therapy in pre-menopausal women.
  • Chemotherapy drugs: Some chemo drugscan damage the ovaries of pre-menopausal women so they no longer make estrogen. Ovarian function can return months or years later in some women, but in others the damage to the ovaries is permanent and leads to menopause.

All of these methods can cause symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and mood swings.

(Video) Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy for Estrogen Receptor Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer - Mayo Clinic

Hormone therapy after surgery for breast cancer

After surgery, hormone therapy can be given to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back. Taking an AI, either alone or after tamoxifen, has been shown to work better than taking just tamoxifen for 5 years.

These hormone therapy schedules are known to be helpful for women who are post-menopausal when diagnosed:

  • Tamoxifen for 2 to 3 years, followed by an AI for 2 to 3 years (5 years total of treatment)
  • Tamoxifen for 2 to 3 years, followed by an AI for 5 years (7 to 8 years of treatment)
  • Tamoxifen for 4½ to 6 years, followed by an AI for 5 years (9½ to 11 years of treatment)
  • Tamoxifen for 5 to 10 years
  • An AI for 5 to 10 years
  • An AI for 2 to 3 years, followed by tamoxifen for 2 to 3 years (5 years total of treatment)
  • For women who are unable to take an AI, tamoxifen for 5 to 10 years is an option

For most post-menopausal women whose cancers are hormone receptor-positive, most doctors recommend taking an AI at some point during adjuvant (after surgery) therapy. Standard treatment is to take these drugs for about 5 years, or to take in sequence with tamoxifen for 5 to 10 years. For women at a higher risk of recurrence, hormone treatment for longer than 5 years may be recommended.Tamoxifen is an option for some women who cannot take an AI. Taking tamoxifen for 10 years is considered more effective than taking it for 5 years, but you and your doctor will decide the best schedule of treatment for you.

These therapy schedules are known to be helpful for women who are pre-menopausal when diagnosed:

  • Tamoxifen (with or without ovarian suppression) for 5 to 10 years.
  • Tamoxifen (with or without ovarian suppression) for 5 years followed by an AI for 5 years if you have gone through menopause.
  • AI plus some sort of ovarian suppression (see above) for 5 to 10 years.

If you have early-stage breast cancer and had not gone through menopause when you were first diagnosed, your doctor might recommend taking tamoxifen first, and then taking an AI later if you go through menopause during treatment. Another option is ovarian suppression by getting a drug called a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, which turns off the ovaries, along with an AI. Pre-menopausal women should not take an AI alone for breast cancer treatment because it is unsafe and can increase hormone levels.

If cancer comes back or has spread

AIs, tamoxifen, and fulvestrant can be used to treat more advanced hormone-positive breast cancers, especially in post-menopausal women. They are often continued for as long as they are helpful. Pre-menopausal women might be offered tamoxifen alone or an AI in combination with an LHRH agonist for advanced disease.

Less common types of hormone therapy

Some other types of hormone therapy that were used more often in the past, but are rarely given now include:

(Video) Hormonal therapy in breast cancer

  • Megestrol acetate (Megace), a progesterone-like drug
  • Androgens (male hormones), like testosterone
  • Estradiol (a form of estrogen)

These might be options if other forms of hormone therapy are no longer working, but they can often cause side effects.

FAQs

What is the success rate of hormone therapy for cancer? ›

In 85% to 90% of cases of advanced prostate cancer, hormone therapy can shrink the tumor. However, hormone therapy for prostate cancer doesn't work forever. The problem is that not all cancer cells need hormones to grow. Over time, these cells that aren't reliant on hormones will spread.

Is hormone therapy for breast cancer worth it? ›

Hormone therapy following surgery, radiation or chemotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence in people with early-stage hormone-sensitive breast cancers. It can also effectively reduce the risk of metastatic breast cancer growth and progression in people with hormone-sensitive tumors.

Does hormone treatment stop cancer spreading? ›

Hormone therapy shrinks the cancer and slows down its growth, wherever it has spread to in the body. It can't cure the cancer, but it can keep it under control, sometimes for several years. It can also help manage symptoms of advanced cancer, such as bone pain.

What happens if I refuse hormone therapy for breast cancer? ›

A study has found that postmenopausal women who stop taking hormonal therapy early or skip doses are much more likely to have a breast cancer recurrence than women who take hormonal therapy as prescribed.

What is the survival rate for estrogen positive breast cancer? ›

Besides, the overall survival rate of breast cancer patients on estrogen positive receptors was 41.51% at 6 years follow-up . However, estrogen negative receptor patients overall survival rate was found to be 21.01% at 6 years follow-up.

How long does hormone therapy work for breast cancer? ›

Standard treatment is to take these drugs for about 5 years, or to take in sequence with tamoxifen for 5 to 10 years. For women at a higher risk of recurrence, hormone treatment for longer than 5 years may be recommended.

What are the disadvantages of hormone therapy for cancer? ›

Certain hormone therapies increase the risk for other health concerns. They can include blood clots, stroke, cataracts, heart attacks, and strokes. They can also increase the risk for uterine cancer. It is important to note that there can be other side effects that are not listed here.

What type breast cancer has the highest recurrence rate? ›

Research suggests that estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer is more likely to come back more than five years after diagnosis.

Is hormone therapy better than chemotherapy for breast cancer? ›

Contrary to the commonly held view, 2 years after diagnosis, hormone therapy, a highly effective breast cancer treatment worsens quality of life to a greater extent and for a longer time, especially in menopausal patients. The deleterious effects of chemotherapy are more transient.

Can hormonal therapy cure cancer? ›

Hormone therapy is used to treat cancers that use hormones to grow, such as some prostate and breast cancers. Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment that slows or stops the growth of cancer that uses hormones to grow. Hormone therapy is also called hormonal therapy, hormone treatment, or endocrine therapy.

Which is better radiation or hormone therapy? ›

"Our findings show that radiotherapy is still highly effective in significantly improving local control and disease-free survival in combination with anti-hormones, compared to anti-hormones alone. This remains true after long-term follow-up of breast cancer patients with a good prognosis.

How quickly does hormone therapy work? ›

It may take a few weeks to feel the effects of treatment and there may be some side effects at first. A GP will usually recommend trying treatment for 3 months to see if it helps. If it does not, they may suggest changing your dose, or changing the type of HRT you're taking.

Can you survive breast cancer without hormones? ›

Postmenopausal patients with "ultralow-risk" breast cancers may be able to forgo standard endocrine treatment with tamoxifen, which is routinely prescribed after surgery for many patients.

What percentage of breast cancer survivors have a recurrence? ›

According to the Susan G. Komen® organization, women with early breast cancer most often develop local recurrence within the first five years after treatment. On average, 7 percent to 11 percent of women with early breast cancer experience a local recurrence during this time.

When are you considered cancer free after breast cancer? ›

The cancer may come back to the same place as the original primary tumor or to another place in the body. If you remain in complete remission for five years or more, some doctors may say that you are cured, or cancer-free.

Is hormone positive breast cancer curable? ›

Estrogen receptor status helps guide breast cancer treatment. ER-positive breast cancers can be treated with hormone therapies such as tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors and ovarian suppression.

How do you prevent estrogen positive breast cancer recurrence? ›

After surgery, most women diagnosed with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer take hormonal therapy medicine to reduce the risk of recurrence. There are several types of hormonal therapy medicines. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is one of the most well-known.

Is it better to have estrogen positive breast cancer? ›

Hormone receptor-positive cancers tend to grow more slowly than those that are hormone receptor-negative. Women with hormone receptor-positive cancers tend to have a better outlook in the short-term, but these cancers can sometimes come back many years after treatment.

Which breast cancer has the best prognosis? ›

Non-invasive (stage 0) and early-stage invasive breast cancers (stages I and II) have a better prognosis than later stage cancers (stages III and IV). Breast cancer that's only in the breast and has not spread to the lymph nodes has a better prognosis than breast cancer that's spread to the lymph nodes.

What type of breast cancer is treated with hormones? ›

Two SERMs, tamoxifen and toremifene, are approved to treat metastatic breast cancer. The antiestrogen fulvestrant is approved for postmenopausal women with metastatic ER-positive breast cancer that has spread after treatment with other antiestrogens (10).

Can Stage 4 breast cancer go into remission? ›

Is it possible to survive stage 4 breast cancer? While there is no cure for metastatic breast cancer, it is possible to control it with treatment for a number of years. The cancer can also go into remission.

How long do you see an oncologist after breast cancer? ›

Doctor visits: If you have finished treatment, your follow-up visits will probably be every few months at first. The longer you have been free of cancer, the less often the appointments are needed. After 5 years, they are typically done about once a year.

How long do the treatment effects of hormone therapy last? ›

They may last for 2 to 30 minutes and you may have a few a month or more often. They are the same as the hot flushes women have when going through menopause. , because these drugs cut testosterone production off altogether. Getting overheated, drinking tea or coffee, and smoking can all make flushes worse.

How can I reduce the side effects of hormone therapy? ›

Exercise may help reduce some of the side effects of hormone therapy, including bone loss, muscle loss, weight gain, fatigue, and insulin resistance (20, 32).

What cancer is most likely to return? ›

Cancers with the highest recurrence rates include: Glioblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer, has a near 100 percent recurrence rate, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuro-Oncology.

What are the signs of cancer coming back? ›

Warning signs of a distant recurrence tend to involve a different body part from the original cancer site. For example, if cancer recurs in the lungs, you might experience coughing and difficulty breathing, while a recurrence of cancer in the brain can cause seizures and headaches.

How can I prevent cancer recurrence? ›

The American Cancer Society recommends cancer survivors: Take part in regular physical activity. Limit sitting or lying down time and return to normal daily activities as soon as possible. Aim to get at least 150 to 300 minutes per week of moderate intensity activity or 75 to 150 minutes per week of vigorous activity.

Can breast cancer be treated with hormone therapy only? ›

Hormone therapy is only likely to work if the breast cancer cells have oestrogen receptors (ER). Your doctor checks your cancer cells for these receptors when you are diagnosed.

What is the most common treatment for breast cancer? ›

Most women undergo surgery for breast cancer and many also receive additional treatment after surgery, such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or radiation. Chemotherapy might also be used before surgery in certain situations.

What are the risks of hormone therapy? ›

Research has shown that MHT is associated with the following health effects:
  • Hip and vertebral fractures. ...
  • Vaginal bleeding. ...
  • Urinary incontinence. ...
  • Dementia. ...
  • Stroke, blood clots, and heart attack. ...
  • Breast cancer. ...
  • Lung cancer. ...
  • Colorectal cancer.
17 Jul 2018

Can hormonal therapy cure cancer? ›

Hormone therapy is used to treat cancers that use hormones to grow, such as some prostate and breast cancers. Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment that slows or stops the growth of cancer that uses hormones to grow. Hormone therapy is also called hormonal therapy, hormone treatment, or endocrine therapy.

What are the disadvantages of hormone therapy for cancer? ›

Certain hormone therapies increase the risk for other health concerns. They can include blood clots, stroke, cataracts, heart attacks, and strokes. They can also increase the risk for uterine cancer. It is important to note that there can be other side effects that are not listed here.

Which is better chemo or hormone therapy? ›

Contrary to the commonly held view, 2 years after diagnosis, hormone therapy, a highly effective breast cancer treatment worsens quality of life to a greater extent and for a longer time, especially in menopausal patients. The deleterious effects of chemotherapy are more transient.

Which is better radiation or hormone therapy? ›

"Our findings show that radiotherapy is still highly effective in significantly improving local control and disease-free survival in combination with anti-hormones, compared to anti-hormones alone. This remains true after long-term follow-up of breast cancer patients with a good prognosis.

What type breast cancer has the highest recurrence rate? ›

Research suggests that estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer is more likely to come back more than five years after diagnosis.

How does hormone therapy cure breast cancer? ›

Hormone therapy (also called hormonal therapy, hormone treatment, or endocrine therapy) slows or stops the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors by blocking the body's ability to produce hormones or by interfering with effects of hormones on breast cancer cells.

What is the best hormone therapy for breast cancer? ›

Tamoxifen is one of the most commonly used hormone therapies for breast cancer. Women who are still having periods (are pre menopausal) and women who have had their menopause (post menopausal) can take tamoxifen. You might also have this treatment if you are a man with breast cancer.

Which breast cancer has the best prognosis? ›

Non-invasive (stage 0) and early-stage invasive breast cancers (stages I and II) have a better prognosis than later stage cancers (stages III and IV). Breast cancer that's only in the breast and has not spread to the lymph nodes has a better prognosis than breast cancer that's spread to the lymph nodes.

How quickly does hormone therapy work? ›

It may take a few weeks to feel the effects of treatment and there may be some side effects at first. A GP will usually recommend trying treatment for 3 months to see if it helps. If it does not, they may suggest changing your dose, or changing the type of HRT you're taking.

How long do you see an oncologist after breast cancer? ›

Doctor visits: If you have finished treatment, your follow-up visits will probably be every few months at first. The longer you have been free of cancer, the less often the appointments are needed. After 5 years, they are typically done about once a year.

What are the risks of hormone therapy? ›

Research has shown that MHT is associated with the following health effects:
  • Hip and vertebral fractures. ...
  • Vaginal bleeding. ...
  • Urinary incontinence. ...
  • Dementia. ...
  • Stroke, blood clots, and heart attack. ...
  • Breast cancer. ...
  • Lung cancer. ...
  • Colorectal cancer.
17 Jul 2018

What does hormone therapy do to your body? ›

Hormone replacement therapy is medication that contains female hormones. You take the medication to replace the estrogen that your body stops making during menopause. Hormone therapy is most often used to treat common menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes and vaginal discomfort.

Can you have radiation without hormone therapy? ›

Purpose: Hormone therapy without radiation therapy is considered appropriate for women age 70 or above with low-risk, hormone-positive breast cancer after partial mastectomy. However, some patients may prefer radiation without hormone therapy, for which there is minimal modern data.

How long is hormone therapy after radiotherapy? ›

You might have hormone therapy before, during and after radiotherapy. Doctors usually recommend that you have the treatment for between 3 months and 3 years. How long depends on the risk of your cancer coming back and how many side effects you get.

Can I skip radiation after lumpectomy? ›

A new study suggests some low-risk breast cancer patients can omit radiation after lumpectomy. After surgery, some cancer patients can safely skip radiation or chemotherapy, according to two studies exploring shorter, gentler cancer care.

What foods should be avoided with anastrozole? ›

Avoid raw fruits, vegetables, whole-grain breads, cereals, and seeds. Soluble fiber is found in some foods and absorbs fluid, which can help relieve diarrhea.

Videos

1. CANTO study: impact of breast cancer hormone therapy on quality of life
(Gustave Roussy)
2. What is hormone therapy for breast cancer?
(You and Breast Cancer)
3. HR+ breast cancer: endocrine therapy, surgery and radiotherapy
(VJOncology)
4. Clearing Up Misconceptions about Hormone Therapy and Breast Cancer
(Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-James Cancer Hospital & Solove Research Institute)
5. NCCN Animation for Patients: Overview of Endocrine Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer
(NCCN)
6. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer and the Side Effects of Tamoxifen
(Seattle Cancer Care Alliance)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Madonna Wisozk

Last Updated: 11/12/2022

Views: 6007

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 95% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Madonna Wisozk

Birthday: 2001-02-23

Address: 656 Gerhold Summit, Sidneyberg, FL 78179-2512

Phone: +6742282696652

Job: Customer Banking Liaison

Hobby: Flower arranging, Yo-yoing, Tai chi, Rowing, Macrame, Urban exploration, Knife making

Introduction: My name is Madonna Wisozk, I am a attractive, healthy, thoughtful, faithful, open, vivacious, zany person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.